Parrot Rescued!

It’s not just primates! At NPC, we believe that all species should live freely in their natural habitat. That’s why we help rescue of any animal we find being trafficked.

Today we were able to help the wildlife Authorities in Moyobamba to transport a young parrot that was captured from the wild. Its wings had been cut so it wouldn’t fly away.

If all goes well it will be one of the lucky ones and be able to return to the wild once its feathers have grown back.

Tamarin Rescued!

Yesterday we received a call for the Regional Environmental Authorities in Moyobamba, asking our help in rescuing a tamarin (Leontocebus sp.), which appeared to have been abandoned and tied to an avocado tree in the city.

Together with officials from the regional authority, our team caught and untied the animal, transporting it to the nearby offices of the authorities. The animal is now receiving its veterinary evaluations, while we try and find a suitable rescue centre for re-homing. We hope that this sad tale will at least serve as a reminder to everyone that wild animals are not pets!

Monkeys Rescued!

Last Saturday our volunteers alerted us to a large headed capuchin monkey (Sapajus macrocephalus) on the roof of a house in Moyobamba. The monkey was possibly a pet that had escaped from a nearby house.

We informed the Regional Environmental Authorities, who immediately seized the animal. The same day, the authorities also received a squirrel monkey (Saimiri sp.) which was handed in voluntarily by the person who found it.

For now, both monkeys are being kept by ARA until an appropriate rescue centre is able to receive them. We have been helping feed and care for both animals as well as taking them for their veterinary checks.

Luckily both monkeys are in good health, although they are very attached to people. We are very grateful to the team of ARA – Moyobamba for her quick and decisive action in this case.

Wild Animals are not Pets!

Spider Monkey Rescue

Rescued spider monkey
Rescued spider monkey

Yesterday we helped the ARA San Martin with a rescued baby Peruvian spider monkey (Ateles chamek). This animal was kept as a pet and confiscated in northern San Martin, far outside of its distribution. We were asked by the authorities to help with the transport and medical tests before being sent to a rescue centre in Loreto, in it’s natural distribution. Sadly this is this is not an isolated case and even during the pandemic we are finding animals illegally trafficked around Peru.

Woolly Monkey Rescue

Yesterday we were very pleased to be able to help the wildlife authorities of San Martin with transport and medical tests for two common woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagothricha). These victims of illegal wildlife trafficking were being transferred to a rescue centre in Loreto. Thankfully they were given a clean bill of health and we were able to send them immediately. At their new home they will have more space and be able to mix with others of their species, and maybe even return to the wild in the future.

Ocelot Rescue

We have been helping another victim of the illegal wildlife trade.

This baby ocelot was rescued by the wildlife authorities in Moyobamba, Peru, and has been recovering under veterinary care. Today he will arrive at his new home, the RAREC rescue centre in Iquitos.

Please do not buy wildlife (you are not rescuing the animal if you do, you are just encouraging further trade) and please do not frequent attractions that use wildlife illegally!

Spider Monkey Rescue

At the end of last week we were called to help with the rescue of an adult male black spider monkey (Ateles Chamek), an Endangered species that was being kept in a small cage in Tocache in Southern San Martin, Peru.

Once the operation started the authorities also found another baby black spider monkey and a Critically Endangered yellow tailed woolly monkey (Lagothrix flavicauda)! These last two were being kept together in a hanging bird cage.

None of the animals had any enrichment and the cages were far too small. Thanks to the quick work of the San Martin regional environmental authority and our long time collaborator Gabriel Garcia, who was working nearby at the time, the three animals were rescued and have all now been sent to rescue centres.

As these are all endangered species the punishment under Peruvian law is more severe and we hope that the wildlife authorities will use this power to properly prosecute the criminals involved.

Many thanks to IPPL and our private donors for continuing to fund our rescue and anti-trafficking work, without this support we wouldn’t be able to help animals like these.

Ocelot Rescue!

It’s only the 5th of January and we already have our first rescue of the year, a baby Ocelot. We don’t know his story yet, but tomorrow we will start with the paperwork and with finding him a good home in a rescue centre.

He is doing well but his test results came back positive for multiple types of intestinal and skin parasites, most probably due to poor care after his capture and proximity to domestic animals. We have just given him his first treatment and hope he will fully recover soon.

Reptile Rescue

Introducing yet another victim of the illegal wildlife trade…

On Saturday 26th of October, the Regional Environmental Authority (ARA in Spanish) of San Martín, Moyobamba office, confiscated two false monitor lizards (Callopistes flavipunctatus). This is a species of lizard that lives in the dry equatorial forest of the Peruvian coast and is categorized as Near Threatened under Peruvian law (D.S. Nº 004-2014-MINAGRI).

The animals arrived dehydrated, hungry and very very cold (low body temperature). The ARA of San Martín asked for our help caring for the animals while finding a suitable rescue centre. Unfortunately, one of the lizards died due to internal bleeding, probably as a result of blows at the moment of capture.

However, together with ARA and the Ecological Police, we coordinated the transfer of the surviving individual to the ARA of Lambayeque, on the coast in Chiclayo, where it will be properly screened and, hopefully, released back to the wild. We want to thank engineer Andreína De La Cruz of ARA San Martín and officer Flores and Rivas of the Ecological Police for their outstanding work as wildlife authorities.